Figures of speech

Speech+coaches+Jeremy+Starks+%28left%29+and+Joseph+Peculiar+%28right%29+are+taking+over+Miller+Speech.+They+hope+to+accomplish+success+in+speech+competitions+and+the+formation+of+a+debate+team.+
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Figures of speech

Speech coaches Jeremy Starks (left) and Joseph Peculiar (right) are taking over Miller Speech. They hope to accomplish success in speech competitions and the formation of a debate team.

Speech coaches Jeremy Starks (left) and Joseph Peculiar (right) are taking over Miller Speech. They hope to accomplish success in speech competitions and the formation of a debate team.

Photos by A. Hanson

Speech coaches Jeremy Starks (left) and Joseph Peculiar (right) are taking over Miller Speech. They hope to accomplish success in speech competitions and the formation of a debate team.

Photos by A. Hanson

Photos by A. Hanson

Speech coaches Jeremy Starks (left) and Joseph Peculiar (right) are taking over Miller Speech. They hope to accomplish success in speech competitions and the formation of a debate team.

Abby Hanson, Copy Editor

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For many students, starting school can be nerve-wracking. Try being both a new teacher and a new coach. Teachers Jeremy Starks and Joseph Peculis are taking on their first year as Noblesville educators and speech coaches.

Jeremy Starks, 23, teaches English 9 at NHS. Before coming to Noblesville, he studied at Purdue University and taught a year at Lafayette’s McCutchen High School as a student teacher.

What does your role entail?

I see this as a concentrated effort among a group of leaders, not just me as the head coach saying, ‘We’re doing this, this and this.’ I want to make sure that there’s cohesiveness and lines of communication [with other coaches] as well as the six captains. It’s not a one-man show, and if it was, it would be terrible.

What were you like in high school?

I was studious and I got my work done, but I was usually the one to be the wise-cracking joker. I was able to take that class clown energy and redirect that energy to stuff that was more productive, like [theater and improv].

 What’s your favorite part?

At the start of the year [students] have this piece, and you’re always giving feedback…but by the end of the season, [I] just kind of sit there in awe to think, ‘God, this is where student A started, and now they’re here.’

Joseph Peculis, 22, is a first-year Chemistry teacher and Indiana University graduate. After studying debate in high school and cololege, he looks forward to leading the first debate team at NHS in over a decade.

What’s your goal for the year?

My goal is to get it to the point where we have a formal team and we have students coming and competing. Part of my goal with that is eventually merging with the speech team.

What makes you qualified?

I think being in it this long definitely helps. I was a debater. I’ve coached. I’ve judged. I’ve seen it from all different angles.

What quirks come out in your teaching or coaching?

I like to think I’m hip. My students don’t. I was telling them about my Myspace last week, and they were making fun of me about that. I like to try and convince myself that I’m still in-the-know, but my students like to laugh at me about that.

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