A NHS safeguard

Behind the scenes of the color guard, members have lots of thoughts on the most recent activity

Analyce Craft, Staff Writer

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A quiet auditorium, students yawn and shift in their seats, itching for the moment when they’re able to move from their places. Through the silence, music cuts on and then it begins, a shocking burst of color and movement, catching the attention and interest of the entire crowd.

Color guard is a performance art that many at NHS can pride themselves in being passionate about. The group itself has undergone many changes and struggles within itself, but the group of young performers never fail to give their all.

“Color guard is an important hobby to me,” Sophomore Elisha Baker said. “I do it for fun. The family atmosphere is great and it really helps with my fitness and the dance classes I take.”

Other members agree, eager to share how color guard has impacted them.

“It’s like a safe haven. I’m able to be with people who are passionate about what we do,” Junior McKatelyn Lawson said. “It helps to get away from everything else and just focus on one area.”

Even though color guard is said to impact its members positively, there are some concerns with the participants.

“Before sixth grade I didn’t even know what color guard was,” Baker said. “It definitely deserves more recognition than it gets.”

Lawson agrees, pointing out some positives of their current situation.

“It’s gotten better. We’ve got a good association with the marching band, which has helped,” Lawson said. “But before, we sometimes wouldn’t even be put on the school news.”

Despite the lack of recognition within the guard itself, the team has been getting attention from its newest addition.

“There’ve been ups and downs,” Lawson said. “The new instructor’s approachable, we won’t have to face as much drama, but it’ll take time to build the same respect.”

Even with drastic changes in leaders, guard members are looking on the bright side.

“We’re learning a lot better and even though he’s older, he’s very relatable,” Lawson said.

Despite the aforementioned “ups and downs,” members believe that the good out weighs the bad.

“Color guard has taught me a lot of life lessons, most to do with teamwork,” Lawson said. “It’s really changed my life.”

 

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